Yakuza: Like a Dragon Review

While Yakuza: Like a Dragon does leave behind many aspects, it still maintains some relation to the previous games in the series. Our new protagonist, Ichiban Kasuga, is an orphan and member of The Tojo Clan and starts his journey in Kamurocho. He’s also quite capable of holding his own in a fight and has a knack for finding himself in absurd situations, much like Kiryu. While the two share a wealth of similarities, Ichiban is not a simple replacement or recreation of Kiryu. While Kiryu is a Yakuza legend for his skills and exploits over the course of the series, Ichiban wears his emotions on his sleeve and is almost completely unknown. This is in large part to an early event that leaves Ichiban in prison for 18 years, while the world and the entirety of the Yakuza series (save for Zero) pass him by.

Godfall Review (PS5)

The frustration I felt playing Godfall was mostly from the disappointment about what it could have been. Which, honestly, is a real shame as there’s a lot of promise here. I can’t recommend that anyone buy Godfall in its current state, but I do sincerely hope they work on this game and maybe fix some of these issues before they launch the DLC next year.

Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales Review (PS5)

2018’s Marvel’s Spider-Man for PlayStation 4 was a really special game for me, as you might imagine for a guy who named his only child after Peter Parker. The Pete that we get in Spider-Man 2018 is one of my favourite interpretations of the character and I’ve been reading Amazing Spider-Man every single month for the past 20 years. It’s probably in my top 10 games of all time.

Umineko When They Cry Review

It might seem absurd for me to say I want to experience even more of Umineko’s story given that ~130 hours is not a small investment of time; but as the final moments were unfolding and the conclusion was drawing near, I felt genuinely sad about the notion of saying goodbye to these wonderful characters, the amazing world in which they inhabit, and their incredible story. While Umineko is indeed a horror story with a tightly woven mystery tying it all together, ultimately it is also a deeply affecting story about love, loss, trauma, catharsis, feminism, family, the value of living, and the importance of our relationships with fellow humans. “Without love, it cannot be seen” is the core message of Umineko, and one which I’ll carry with me for years to come.

Before I Forget Review

Sincerity carries a lot of weight in games, and I can’t think of many games who come across as more sincere than Before I Forget. While it isn’t perfect in execution, it is doing a lot with a little and carries more weight than one would expect from first glance. It is cathartic, moving, hopeful, witty, and affecting all wrapped up in a relatively short experience. It is a game I have no problem recommending, and one I won’t soon forget. 

Necrobarista Review

There is beauty to be found in darkness, and Necrobarista shines a gentle, heartfelt light on it.

Umurangi Generation Review

The concept of the world ending is one of the most tired tropes in video games – and media at large. We have seen an utterly unending slew of different-but-the-same takes on how the end of the world will look, and how humanity will hold on after. That’s why the vibrant, hopeful, and colorful take on the apocalypse presented in Origame Digital’s Umurangi Generation is so effective. It dares to be different.

Final Fantasy VII Remake Review

For nearly as long as I can remember, when following video game culture it feels like there has been a call for Final Fantasy VII to be remade with modern technology. I found this sentiment somewhat absurd, why would you ask for a remake of FFVII when Kingdom Hearts 2 ends with such a cliffhanger???? Well, having played last year’s Kingdom Hearts 3 and this year’s newly released Final Fantasy VII Remake, I can say, I was a fool.

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